Category: DEFAULT

Dracula

0 Comments

dracula

Dracula. Ein Vampirroman | Bram Stoker, Stasi Kull | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Dracula | Bram Stoker, Andreas Nohl | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Dracula ist ein britischer Horrorfilm aus dem Jahr , bei dem Terence Fisher Regie führte. Der Film basiert auf dem Roman Dracula von Bram Stoker, die.

Dracula at first charms Harker with his cordiality and historical knowledge, and even rescues him from the clutches of the three female vampires in the castle.

In truth, however, Dracula merely wishes to keep Harker alive long enough to complete the legal transaction and to learn as much as possible about England.

Dracula leaves his castle and boards a Russian ship, the Demeter , taking along with him 50 boxes of Transylvanian soil, which he needs in order to regain his strength and rest during daylight.

During the voyage to Whitby , a coastal town in northern England, he sustains himself on the ship's crew members.

Only one body is later found, that of the captain, who is found tied up to the ship's helm. The captain's log is recovered and tells of strange events that had taken place during the ship's journey.

Dracula leaves the ship in the form of a dog. There is also a notable link between Dracula and Renfield , a patient in an insane asylum overseen by John Seward , who is compelled to consume insects, spiders , birds, and other creatures—in ascending order of size—in order to absorb their "life force".

Renfield acts as a kind of sensor, reacting to Dracula's proximity and supplying clues accordingly. Dracula begins to visit Lucy's bed chamber on a nightly basis, draining her of blood while simultaneously infecting her with the curse of vampirism.

Van Helsing soon deduces her condition's supernatural origins, but does not speak out. Despite an attempt at keeping the vampire at bay with garlic , Dracula attacks Lucy's house one final time, killing her mother and transforming Lucy herself into one of the undead.

Harker escapes Dracula's castle and returns to England, barely alive and deeply traumatized. She reads his journal and passes it along to Van Helsing.

This unfolds the first clue to the identity of Lucy's assailant, which later prompts Mina to collect all of the events of Dracula's appearance in news articles, saved letters, newspaper clippings and the journals of each member of the group.

This assists the group in investigating Dracula's movements and later discovering that Renfield's behaviour is directly influenced by Dracula.

They then discover that Dracula has purchased a residence just next door to Seward's. The group gathers intelligence to track the location of Dracula for the purpose of destroying him.

After the undead Lucy attacks several children, Van Helsing, Seward, Holmwood and Morris enter her crypt and destroy her to save her soul.

Later, Harker joins them and the party work to discover Dracula's intentions. Harker aids the party in tracking down the locations of the boxes to the various residences of Dracula and discovers that Dracula purchased multiple real estate properties 'over the counter' throughout the North, South, East and West sides of London [18] under the alias 'Count De Ville'.

The party pries open each of the graves, places wafers of Sacramental bread within each of them, and seals them shut. This deprives the Count of his ability to seek safety in those boxes.

As he attempts to enter the room in which Harker and Mina are staying, Renfield tries to stop him; Dracula then mortally wounds him. Van Helsing and Seward discover Dracula biting Mina then forcing her to drink his blood.

The group repel Dracula using crucifixes and sacramental bread, forcing Dracula to flee by turning into a dark vapor.

The party continue to hunt Dracula to search for his remaining lairs. The heroes follow Dracula back to Transylvania, and in a climactic battle with Dracula's gypsy bodyguards, finally destroy him.

Despite the popular image of Dracula having a stake driven through his heart to kill him, Mina's narrative describes his decapitation by Harker's kukri while Morris simultaneously pierced his heart with a Bowie knife Mina Harker's Journal, 6 November, Dracula Chapter His body then turns into dust, but not before Mina sees an expression of peace on his face.

Although early in the novel Dracula dons a mask of cordiality, he often flies into fits of rage when his plans are frustrated.

When the three vampire women who live in his castle attempt to seduce Jonathan Harker, Dracula physically assaults one and ferociously berates them for their insubordination.

He then relents and talks to them more kindly, telling them that he does indeed love each of them. He has an appreciation for ancient architecture, and when purchasing a home he prefers them to be aged, saying "A new home would kill me", and that to make a new home habitable to him would take a century.

He also expresses an interest in the history of the British Empire , speaking admiringly of its people. He has a somewhat primal and predatory worldview; he pities ordinary humans for their revulsion to their darker impulses.

He is not without human emotions, however; he often says that he too can love. Though usually portrayed as having a strong Eastern European accent, the original novel only specifies that his spoken English is excellent, though strangely toned.

His appearance varies in age. He is described early in the novel as thin, with a long white mustache, pointed ears and sharp teeth.

He is dressed all in black and has hair on his palms. Jonathan Harker described him as an old man, "cruel looking" and giving an effect of "extraordinary pallor".

As the novel progresses, Dracula is described as taking on a more and more youthful appearance. After Harker strikes him with a shovel, he is left with a scar on his forehead which he bears throughout the course of the novel.

Dracula also possesses great wealth and having Gypsies in his homeland who are loyal to him as servants and protectors. Count Dracula is portrayed in the novel using many different supernatural abilities, and is believed to have gained his abilities through dealings with the Devil.

Chapter 18 of the novel describes many of the abilities, limitations and weaknesses of vampires and Dracula in particular. Dracula has superhuman strength which, according to Van Helsing, is equivalent to that of 20 strong men.

He does not cast a shadow or have a reflection from mirrors. He is immune to conventional means of attack; a sailor tries to stab him in the back with a knife, but the blade goes through his body as though it is air.

The Count can defy gravity to a certain extent and possesses superhuman agility, able to climb vertical surfaces upside down in a reptilian manner.

He can travel onto "unhallowed" ground such as the graves of suicides and those of his victims. He has powerful hypnotic , telepathic and illusionary abilities.

He also has the ability to "within limitations" vanish and reappear elsewhere at will. If he knows the path, he can come out from anything or into anything regardless of how close it is bound even if it is fused with fire.

He has amassed cunning and wisdom throughout centuries, and he is unable to die by the mere passing of time alone.

He can command animals such as rats, owls, bats, moths, foxes and wolves. However, his control over these animals is limited, as seen when the party first enters his house in London.

Although Dracula is able to summon thousands of rats to swarm and attack the group, Holmwood summons his trio of terriers to do battle with the rats.

The dogs prove very efficient rat killers, suggesting they are Manchester terriers trained for that purpose.

Terrified by the dogs' onslaught, the rats flee and any control which Dracula had over them is gone. Dracula can also manipulate the weather and, within his range, is able to direct the elements, such as storms, fog and mist.

Dracula can shapeshift at will, able to grow and become small, his featured forms in the novel being that of a bat, a wolf, a large dog and a fog or mist.

When the moonlight is shining, he can travel as elemental dust within its rays. He is able to pass through tiny cracks or crevices while retaining his human form or in the form of a vapour; described by Van Helsing as the ability to slip through a hairbreadth space of a tomb door or coffin.

This is also an ability used by his victim Lucy as a vampire. When the party breaks into her tomb, they dismantle the secured coffin to find it completely empty; her corpse being no longer located within.

One of Dracula's most mysterious powers is the ability to turn others into vampires by biting them. According to Van Helsing:.

When they become such, there comes with the change the curse of immortality; they cannot die, but must go on age after age adding new victims and multiplying the evils of the world.

For all that die from the preying of the Un-dead become themselves Un-dead, and prey on their kind. And so the circle goes on ever widening, like as the ripples from a stone thrown in the water.

Friend Arthur, if you had met that kiss which you know of before poor Lucy die, or again, last night when you open your arms to her, you would in time, when you had died, have become nosferatu, as they call it in Eastern Europe, and would for all time make more of those Un-Deads that so have filled us with horror.

The vampire bite itself does not cause death. It is the method vampires use to drain blood of the victim and to increase their influence over them.

This is described by Van Helsing:. The Nosferatu do not die like the bees when they sting once.

He is only stronger, and being stronger, have yet more power to work evil. Those children whose blood she suck are not yet so much worse; but if she live on, Un-Dead, more and more lose their blood and by her power over them they come to her.

But if she die in truth, then all cease; the tiny wounds of the throats disappear, and they go back to their plays unknowing of whatever has been.

As Dracula slowly drains Lucy's blood, she dies from acute blood loss and later transforms into a vampire, despite the efforts of Seward and Van Helsing to provide her with blood transfusions.

He is aided by powers of necromancy and divination of the dead, that all who die by his hand may reanimate and do his bidding. Dracula requires no other sustenance but fresh human blood, which has the effect of rejuvenating him and allowing him to grow younger.

His power is drawn from the blood of others, and he cannot survive without it. Dracula's preferred victims are women.

Count Dracula is depicted as the " King Vampire ", and can control other vampires. To punish Mina and the party for their efforts against him, Dracula bites her on at least three occasions.

He also forces her to drink his blood; this act curses her with the effects of vampirism and gives him a telepathic link to her thoughts. The effects changes Mina' physically and mentally over time.

A few moments after Dracula attacks her, Van Helsing takes a wafer of sacramental bread and places it on her forehead to bless her; when the bread touches her skin, it burns her and leaves a scar on her forehead.

Her teeth start growing longer but do not grow sharper. She begins to lose her appetite, feeling repulsed by normal food, [40] begins to sleep more and more during the day; cannot wake unless at sunset and stops writing in her diary.

When Van Helsing later crumbles the same bread in a circle around her, she is unable to cross or leave the circle, discovering a new form of protection.

But he does it - and is punished severely for it. After that, Mina once again resumes an active role in the groups activities - as it should be, her fighting by their side.

Even though it may have been unintentional on Stoker's part, I was overall pleased with how things turned out, especially for a book written in Is this a feminist text?

I don't want to give you the wrong idea, it is NOT. But how about I file it in the 'not as bad as I thought it was going to be' category on the topic of feminism?

You have Jonathan Harker - Solicitor who is the first in the novel to encounter Dracula. I thought he was a complete ninny and think Mina could have done much better in picking a husband, but oh well.

Very fond of guns and shooting things. If America can go on breeding men like that, she will be a power in the world indeed.

John Seward - Psychologist who runs a mental asylum. Smarter and more badass than either Morris or Harker or Holmwood. I always thought Mina should have married him instead of that nitwit Jonathan Harker.

Arthur Holmwood - Rich. Engaged to Lucy Westenra. My life is hers, and I would give the last drop of blood in my body for her. I have an appetite like a cormorant, am full of life, and sleep well.

An appetite like a cormorant. Welp, that's a new one. Arthur says I am getting fat. Arthur can go fuck himself. What is this, James Bond? Abraham Van Helsing - Badass name for a badass man.

This was the only man I was interested in in the book. Intelligent, ruthless, gets shit done - but is still a kind, loving and polite person.

This is who I would be making eyes at if I were in London at the time. What is my point of listing all these men? So you can discuss whether they are a.

I mean, obviously I am always going to discuss that. But, the reason I'm bringing up the men here is because of their close friendship. Holmwood, Morris and Seward served together in Korea, for crying out loud.

It makes the book sound more like it's taking place in the s or s than the s, but that makes it all the better. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Stoker making these men brothers-in-arms in more ways than one! People who have fought together have a unique bond and trust with each other, and I think that makes these men in particular teaming up again once more - all the more potent.

They unconsciously fall into their old rapport and positions, and, led by Van Helsing, make a stellar team. Mina says that perhaps we are the instruments of ultimate good.

How can women help loving men when they are so earnest, and so true, and so brave! And, too, it made me think of the wonderful power of money!

What can it not do when it is properly applied; and what might it do when basely used! I felt so thankful that Lord Godalming is rich, and that both he and Mr.

Morris, who also has plenty of money, are willing to spend it so freely. For if they did not, our little expedition could not start, either so promptly or so well equipped, as it will within another hour.

Being brave and willing to die fighting vampires is one thing, but it's almost worthless without money for supplies, transportation, and constantly bribing people for information the way our heroes had to in this book.

I'm so proud of Stoker for bringing this up. However, I did not find the bloodsucking in this novel to be erotic at all, and therefore was undisturbed by it.

I know that in this would be considered very erotic bloodsucking - but in , to a pretty jaded vampire-fiction-reader, not so much. This was a relief to me, I was able to read the blood-sucking sections of the book without being too grossed out.

It was more like animals feeding than anything sexual. However, this book DID surprise me by making me genuinely horrified and grossed out.

But it wasn't the bloodsucking, it was the vampire killing. I have a real thing, apparently, against mutilating and desecrating dead bodies.

The scenes of "we're going to open up her coffin! We're going to stake her through the heart! Then chop off her head, cut out her heart, and stuff her mouth with garlic!

It was very horrifying and gross to me. I felt like they were violating the corpses and violating the very sanctity of death by doing this. I was rather shocked, I had no idea I even thought sanctity of death was a belief of mine until they were gleefully beheading cadavers.

O Anyway, that was the true horror of the novel in my eyes. When the Brides approach the men seductively, the men are all over that. Jonathan is ready to strip down and party when the brides show up kneeling in front of him and licking their lips seductively, and Van Helsing himself is not unaffected.

They totally want those women on some level. But if it's Lucy or Mina or a woman who is supposed to be their "pure wife and mother stereotype," the men react with revulsion and disgust when lustful tendencies are shown.

Good luck on Jonathan and Mina ever reproducing if Jonathan's reaction to Mina coming on to him is one of horror and revulsion.

He probably only wants to have sex with all the lights off and missionary position, ten-thrusts-and-then-roll-off-her kind of thing. Probably with his eyes screwed shut the whole time.

I told her not to marry that ninny! And Lucy, goodness gracious. She was a bit sexual even as a "pure maiden," fantasizing about marrying three men at a time and shit, thank goodness she view spoiler [died hide spoiler ] before having sex with Holmwood.

I can't imagine she'd be happy in that marriage. He called her fat - what an asshole! Stoker uses this word 12 times in this novel and it gets seriously annoying.

Sometimes it's multiple times on the same page. It's as if he doesn't know of another word to describe a sexual woman.

Which is weird, because to me this more describes a certain body type than an attitude, but I looked it up in MW and it says that one meaning of the word is "giving pleasure to the senses," so I guess it works.

I am alone in the castle with those awful women. Mina is a woman, and there is naught in common.

They are devils of the Pit! I shall not remain alone with them I'm always rather hesitant to pick up a book considered a classic and written over a hundred years ago, but Stoker delivers.

He uses a lot of modern wording and phrases, the book absolutely speeds along - it's never boring and he doesn't get bogged down describing the scenery for 10 pages.

That being said, I learned a lot of new words reading this: Foreknowledge, missal, unpunctual, prepossessing, perforce, patronymic, saturnine, demoniac not demonic, demoniac!

He uses it 9 times - get used to seeing it! Look at how much richer my vocabulary is now! I am a rich woman! It is odd that a thing which I have been taught to regard with disfavour and as idolatrous should in a time of loneliness and trouble be of help.

Is that there is something in the essence of the thing itself, or that it is a medium, a tangible help, in conveying memories of sympathy and comfort?

This book is strongly pro-Catholic and Catholic doctrine and beliefs are presented as the truth. Notice Van Helsing's liberal use of the Host Wafers - he hands them out like candy.

Even noted Protestants like Harker are wearing crucifixes by the end of the novel. I don't think this is proselytizing, exactly, but there's definitely a strong Catholic flavor and undertone to the novel.

Of course, Catholicism wins the day and provides Harker and his friends with the strength and tools to defeat evil, so ending the novel on a strong pro-Catholic note.

Some people claim that this book is anti-Semitic - I don't feel that it is. But one of the most enjoyable things about Dracula is that everyone reads the book differently and brings their own interpretations and experiences to the text.

It's been claimed as anti-Semitic, queer, homophobic, sexual, anti-sex, feminist, anti-feminist, etc. Dracula and the people who fight him can be stand-ins for anything and anybody, apparently.

Choose your own hot points after reading the novel. You can see I chose "feminist" and "pro-Catholic," but - much like the Bible - you can twist and turn the text until it says what you WANT it to say.

I mean, some of the things Dracula did in this novel were obviously just because he enjoys messing with Harker and tormenting him.

They be nowt but air-blebs! They, an' all grims an'signs an' warnin's, be all invented by parsons an' illsome beuk-bodies an' railway touters to skeer an' scunner hafflin's, an' to get folks to do somethin' that they don't other incline to do.

And what's even worse is that Stoker doesn't have to do it. Van Helsing speaks in a very distinct and "foreign" type of English, and yet Stoker never resorts to breaking down his words into atrociously spelled ones.

Here's an example of how Van Helsing speaks: He has the strength of many in his hand He can transform himself to wolf He can come in mist which he create He come on moonlight rays as elemental dust..

He become so small He can, when once he find his way, come out from anything or into anything, no matter how close it be bound or even fused up with fire I wish he'd done that for the working-class side characters!

I am so happy that I own a copy, it is going to be read and re-read over and over again, I can tell you that. I was so happy and pleased with this book - and it's so hit-or-miss with classics that I had no idea what to expect.

I highly recommend this to anyone who has an interest in it. Van Helsing, are you mad? How come that's never shown in any film?!?!?!?!

This is a National Geographic feature on a Romanian people living in the Carpathians and in the Transylvanian Alps etc. Here at this site: You can read about them, see pictures of them, and hear them sing.

It will really give you a more vivid and nuanced picture of what Jonathan Harker is seeing and hearing while traveling through Transylvania.

Make sure to check out the left side in order to access Photo Gallery and Multimedia where you can hear them singing!

Oh, and if you click also on the left Sights and Sounds: View all 61 comments. Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend.

Despite being hailed " the most famous figure of seductive evil " in literature, Count Dracula proves to be neither scary nor seductive. View all 21 comments.

What started out as a simple real estate deal by an English solicitor and a foreign nobleman, becomes a blood sucking nightmare. The shell shocked Jonathan is imprisoned by the creepy Count, a " person" you wouldn't want to see in a dark alley on a moonless midnight walk.

Three strange , bizarre , but v "Children of the night what music they play" ; Jonathan Hawker hears those chilling, famous words from the inhuman appearing Count Dracula, in the remote Castle Dracula , Transylvania Romania.

Three strange , bizarre , but very beautiful women, brides of Dracula, the weird sisters, are in his room looking not quite real.

When Dracula arrives also, they fade away Next day the Englishman can't decide if what he saw last night was a dream or fact Either way the terrified Mr.

Hawker escapes , as if his life depended on it, not caring about those eerie wolves , surrounding the building and disappears Back in "civilized", safe England his fiance Mina on vacation in Whitby, is visiting her sick, good friend Lucy Westenra, she becomes very pale too, almost like ill Lucy who is losing blood, why?

Seward with the help of Dr. Van Helsing an expert in little known diseases, gives her Lucy, four transfusions, still she becomes weaker, and small punctures are spotted on Miss Westenra's neck, what can they be?

A gruesome Bat is seen flying outside the window, lurking about waiting for who knows what Seward, the head of an insane asylum, has a star inmate named Renfield he likes keeping busy, by eating flies and spiders.

Something unnatural is disturbing the disturb man. Renfield even attempts to kill the good doctor.

On the continent the dazed Jonathan, is found in a hospital in Budapest, disclosing events, in his journal, read by Mina when they get him back home..

Dracula is seen by Hawker in England, or was this man, the undead fiend , actually the Count? Better speak to Dr. Van Helsing, who they say has read about vampires and is an expert on the subject.

This old Dutchman doesn't mind getting his hands dirty The novel has inspired countless films, books and television shows There is an obvious reason for this phenomenon It still scares people The historical figure was a Romanian Prince, Vlad or Dracula, son 0f Dracul, the Dragon , known as the Impaler, an alias he acquired , and well deserved too View all 8 comments.

View all 29 comments. View all 7 comments. This was neither as bad as I assumed it would be or nor? Much as I love receiving real mail, whether it's a letter, present, post card, or even just a book I ordered Shucks, for me?

This is especially true when a lot of what you're reading is the journals of a bunch of people you'd never even want to have passing conversations with, Dr.

Van Helsing and Dr. Sewa This was neither as bad as I assumed it would be or nor? Seward being obvious exceptions. Regardless, this is one of those books that fall under my largely arbitrary and completely self-imposed "Must Read Before I'm Dead" list.

In the midst of being asphyxiated by Proustian self-reckoning, I decided to take a break from being challenged and read something light.

You know, like a Gothic novel about an immortal Vlad Tepes and his baby-eating whore-beasts. It's funny what pop culture'll do to ya.

I'd heard over and over again that this was like the Book of Genesis for the whole Twilight romancing the undead thing that weirds me out anew with each internet-drenched day.

A lovelorn Oldman, a sexually-repressed and reincarnated Ryder, absinth, slow-dancing in a castle with candles and string-music and shit, vampire nipple-sucking, orgasm-inducing illnesses, etc.

Wrong, wrong, and wrong again. Turns out, the movie's entire romantic twist on the story was really just artistic license on roids, and all Mina is to Dracula is a leisurely Sunday brunch.

I don't mean to insinuate that I was disappointed by this difference between book and screen as, needless to say, I have yet find myself reaching for the 19th-century literary fiction shelf when I feeeeeel like maaakin' lurrrrve.

Still, I think it's a distinction which inquiring minds may appreciate knowing before committing to this occasionally exciting but largely sloggy story.

The good parts were great, but the last ish pages-- appropriately set on a bunch of fucking boats just inching their way along the river--moved so slowly, became so tedious that I just felt like screaming "Christ Almighty, Dracula, would you just eat these fuckers already?

The first half is fun, though! Oh, and how dare you keep Tom Waits locked up in a cage. That's it, I'm calling your mother. View all 56 comments.

I am so happy to have reread this for the 3rd time. Dracula is a book I will continue to reread periodically for the rest of my life.

If you haven't read this yet, please give it a go, it may surprise you. Full review to come Rereading one of my favorite books of all time with some buddies from Bookstagram!

I read this for the first time in high school and then again right after I completed undergraduate school. I am looking forward to seeing if I pi A true masterpiece.

View all 4 comments. It introduced Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

The story is told in epistolary format, as a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper articles, and ships' log entries, whose narrators are the novel's protagonists, and occasionally supplemented with newspaper clippings relating events not directly witnessed.

Apr 24, Lola rated it liked it Shelves: I blame modern TV shows and movies for growing that thought into my mind over the years.

Oh and this, too: You're one deceiving cover. Dracula is such a romanticized character nowadays that being exposed to his true — Bram Stoker style — self made me take a step back and reconsider my first opinion of him, which was mainly positive.

It starts off with Jonathan Harker paying a visit to count Dracula who wants to buy a house; Jonathan is in charge of the paperwork.

During his visit, Dracula is extremely courteous with him, but Mr. Harker quickly realizes that his host is not who he pretends to be.

You get the idea. As for the story itself, I liked it. A lot of telling and little conversation. From time to time, I strongly wanted to shake some conversation out of the characters; come on!

I never even thought about closing the book and cursing it for its slowness, because I was always enticed by what was wafting through the air: Gothic, so, so gothic.

I got goose bumps just writing this review. View all 54 comments. Feb 21, Ginger rated it really liked it Recommended to Ginger by: I want to suck your blood!!

What an amazing Gothic classic to listen too! So, I finally did it. I took on the granddaddy of all vampire books.

I decided to listen to this one instead of reading it due to a great recommendation from a friend on here.

I think this was a great decision to do since the characters in the audio book were excellent, especially Susan Duerden. Her voice was beautiful and mesmerizing as Lucy Westenra!

All the narrators did such a great job with each character. Th I want to suck your blood!! Boxes of dirt was used a bit too much among other things in the story.

I get it Stoker , he needed a place to lay his head. Did they even have editors back then?! Well done Stoker on writing such a well-loved book that has tested the age of time and public opinion.

He basically created the legend. Bau ha ha ha! Check it off the list. I don't think you'll be disappointed!

Apr 19, Jason Pettus rated it really liked it. Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally.

In which I read a hundred so-called "classic" books for the first time, then write reports on whether or not I think they deserve the label Book Dracula , by Bram Stoker The story in a nutshell: To best understand the storyline of Dracula , it's important to imagine yourself as a Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.

To best understand the storyline of Dracula , it's important to imagine yourself as an actual citizen of when the book was written, and then imagine one of your friends positing the following question: What if some of the horrible monsters mentioned in old Gothic literature from centuries past were actually real, and what if one of these ghouls decided one day to move to your hometown?

Because that's the entire premise behind Stoker's original plotline, something easily forgotten in our modern times when even the s look quaint and historic; that the real thrill of this novel to his contemporary fans was not just the premise of a blood-sucking vampire living somewhere in the bowels of eastern Europe, but that this vampire decides to pack up and move to England instead, mostly because after hundreds of years of killing, the people of his section of the world have finally caught on that he's an inhuman monster.

That's what takes young goofy lawyer Jonathan Harker at the beginning of the book out to the wilds of rural Transylvania; it's his firm that's helping this reclusive member of the aristocracy transfer property and money and the like into the English legal system, and as the most junior member Harker is the one assigned to actually transport all the finished documents out to Dracula's spooky family castle in the middle of the Carpathian Mountains, for his final okay and signatures.

Ah, but the Count turns out to not be exactly what he seems, with creepier and creepier experiences finally culminating with an attack on Harker's life, the stealing of Harker's information by Dracula, and a whirlwind sea voyage to the pastoral English coastal village of Whitby, where Harker is originally from and where his plucky fiance Mina patiently awaits his return.

All of this, by the way, is told not through a traditional omniscient narrator and standard dialogue, but through a whole series of written documents such as diary entries, letters, newspaper clippings and more, coincidentally making Dracula one of the best-known examples of what's called an "epistolary novel.

Thinking that his beloved has fallen under a rare disease, one of these Whitby residents calls in a friend of his from Amsterdam, the Indiana-Jones-like exotic-disease specialist and world traveler Abraham Van Helsing, who quickly realizes that this quaint seaside resort town in fact has a vampire on its hands.

This leads to a whole series of action sequences, fight scenes, chase scenes, a trip back over to eastern Europe, and all kinds of other details I won't spoil; needless to say, things come to a "head" ha ha back at Dracula's Transylvanian castle, leading all to a nice old-fashioned "good guys definitively win" ending, perfect for the moralistic times in which Stoker lived.

The argument for it being a classic: It's also one of the first books, fans claim, to present a truly complex and unpredictable main female character -- Mina Harker, that is, who it could be argued is much more the hero of this tale than the globetrotting vampire-killer Van Helsing -- although none of this should really come as a surprise, given that author Bram Stoker's mother was the famous early feminist Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornely.

And if all this wasn't enough, fans argue, the book remains a surprisingly thrilling one to this day, and surprisingly scary for a story that is now years old and counting.

Like many Victorian novels, critics claim, reading the page Dracula anymore is bound to make you think of that line from The Simpsons , when Homer meets British comedian Ricky Gervais: Not to mention, there's that little matter of the films that have now referenced vampires throughout the decades, the thousands of books and television episodes, the countless Dracula costumes worn to endless Halloween parties; when the details of a book become this much an ingrained part of our entire culture, critics claim, it makes trying to read the original book an exercise in frustration, in that you already know in your gut just about everything that's going to happen not to mention every single surprise Stoker laid for his then-unsuspecting s audience.

Again, it makes the book no less important from a historical and scholarly point, but unfortunately just not a book that the general populace should feel like they need to tackle themselves.

So let me mention this before anything else, that after four months now of regular Victorian-novel consumption because of this essay series, how surprisingly more modern and complex Dracula is than many of its contemporaries; it is a much more readable book than many others written in the late s, featuring characters that sometimes are much more complex than usual for a moody Romantic tale, and with a shocking level of gore that has been quietly excised from the Dracula legend over the years by Hollywood and others.

For example, in the original novel they not only would pound stakes through the hearts of vampires to kill them, but shove garlic down their throats and cut off their heads, not for any supernatural reasons but to simply make sure the stupid things were actually dead.

Now, that said, as a fantastical novel from the Romantic period, Dracula certainly does ramble on in overly flowery language a lot more than we 21st-century readers are used to, and especially that self-satisfied blowhard Van Helsing -- yes, we get it, ya Dutch freak, you're a vampire expert , now shut up shut up shut up!

And it certainly will hold almost no surprises to the modern reader either, at least regarding the fact that Dracula is a vampire and what exactly a vampire is a major point of suspense to Stoker's original audience, in that Dracula isn't revealed to be a vampire in the novel until halfway through.

Still, though, all in all the surprising strengths of this book ended up outweighing the expected weaknesses, which is why today I'm confidently declaring Dracula a classic that is definitely worth your time and attention.

Is it a classic? In that sense, then, you can see how such projects from our times like Interview with the Vampire and Buffy the Vampire Slayer are actually a lot more faithful to Stoker's original premise than you might've realized.

View all 9 comments. Oct 29, J. Keely rated it liked it Shelves: Almost every author will fall into one of two camps: The active author looks at the world around them and decides to write about what they see.

They sit down and think: They then construct the story around this theme, creating characters to show different aspects and constructing a plot which moves from general observations to specific insights.

Then there are the r Almost every author will fall into one of two camps: Then there are the reactive authors. These tend to sit down to write a story without necessarily thinking about what the characters or story mean.

Reactive authors will often still touch on the same themes as active authors, but instead of deliberate explorations, we get the author's gut reactions.

In the Late Victorian, one of the ideas that concerned many authors was the 'New Woman', who was a proto-feminist: Since Stoker is a reactive author, we do not get a deliberate analysis of the New Woman: Instead, we get the reactive view: The reactive view is nebulous, switching back and forth, never getting to the heart of the matter.

Stoker does not include the New Woman because he understands her, but because she troubles him. This applies equally to his other recurrent themes: British identity, homosexual and other non-familial desire, scientific innovation, and ancient mysticism.

He includes these things not because he has some insight to reveal to the reader, but because they are concepts he cannot cease bringing up.

They are a part of his world, and so he depicts them. These depictions shift and change with his reactions: It is one of many things which Stoker desires to speak about, to puzzle through, something which both intrigues and unsettles him, which he cannot help but return to whenever he considers humanity.

It is a habit formed by deep emotional connections and powerful memories. He is lost somewhere between the grotesque fall of his former friend Oscar Wilde and his lifelong worship of Wordsworth, whose celebration of homosexuality was an open secret.

Unlike Byron, Shelley, and Polidori, who inspired Stoker's tale of Gothic horror, Stoker is not certain what he thinks about the world he lives in.

He does not have a philosophy or a voice, he is just a man trying to make it through a world which he cannot come to terms with.

Located near the small township of Tihuta, the pass peaks at 3, feet. The Bargau Valley encompasses some of the most beautiful unspoiled mountain scenery in the Carpathians with picturesque traditional villages located in valleys and on hillsides, ideal bases for hiking, riding or discovering their vivid tapestry of old customs, handicrafts and folklore.

Here, you will step into a realm that the fictional Mina Harker described in her diary as "a lovely county; full of beauties of all imaginable kinds, and the people are brave, and strong, and simple, and seem full of nice qualities.

Vlad Tepes was born in in the fortress city of Sighisoara. His father, Vlad Dacul, was the military governor of Transylvania and had become a member of the Order of the Dragon a year before.

The Order, similar to the Order of the Teutonic Knights, was a semi-military and religious organization established in in Rome in order to promote Catholic interests and crusades.

For his deeds, the Order of the Dragon was bestowed upon him, hence the title Dracul the Latin word for dragon is draco. While in medieval lure dragons served as symbols of independence, leadership, strength and wisdom, the biblical association of the devil with the serpent that tempted Adam and Eve gave the snake-like dragon connotations of evil.

Thus, the Romanian word Dracul stands in English for both dragon and devil. Moreover, the ceremonial uniform of the Order — black cloak over red accouterment — was Bram Stocker' source of inspiration for Count Dracula's look.

But how did Bram Stoker's story turn into a myth? A partial explanation is provided by the circumstances under which the book was written and received.

A genuine epidemic of "vampirism" had hit Eastern Europe at the end of the 17th century and continued throughout the 18th century.

The number of reported cases soared dramatically, especially in the Balkans. Travelers returning from the East would tell stories about the undead, which helped keep the interest in vampires alive.

Western philosophers and artists tackled the issue ever more often. Bram Stoker's novel came as the pinnacle of a long series of works based on tales coming from the East.

Back then, most readers were certain that the novel had been inspired by real facts and that its story was perhaps just a bit romanticized.

Dracula is more than years old and still alive! Of course, almost everybody has heard about this Nosferatu: We all have an idea of who or what the Count is.

However, on the other hand, Vlad Tepes Dracula , the historical figure who inspired Bram Stoker's novel, is definitely less well-known. Vlad Tepes was born in December in the fortress of Sighisoara, Romania.

Vlad's father, governor of Transylvania, had been inducted into the Order of the Dragon about one year before. The order — which could be compared to the Knights of the Hospital of St.

John or even to the Teutonic Order of Knights — was a semi-military and religious society, originally created in by the Holy Roman Emperor and his second wife, Barbara Cilli.

The main goal of such a secret fraternal order of knights was to protect the interests of Christianity and to crusade against the Turks. The boyars of Romania associated the dragon with the Devil and decided to call Vlad's father "Dracul," which in the Romanian language means "Devil;" "Dracula" is a diminutive, meaning "the son of the Devil.

Vlad followed his father and lived six years at the princely court. Vlad was held there until This Turkish captivity surely played an important role in Dracula's upbringing; it must be at this period that he adopted a very pessimistic view of life and learned the Turkish method of impalement on stakes.

The Turks set Vlad free after informing him of his father's assassination in He also learned about his older brother's death and how he had been tortured and buried alive by the boyars of Targoviste.

When he was 17 years old, Vlad Tepes Dracula , supported by a force of Turkish cavalry and a contingent of troops lent to him by Pasha Mustafa Hassan, made his first major move toward seizing the Walachian throne.

Vlad became the ruler of Walachia in July of During his six-year reign, he committed many cruelties, hence establishing his controversial reputation.

His first major act of revenge was aimed at the boyars of Targoviste for not being loyal to his father. On Easter Sunday of what we believe to be , he arrested all the boyar families who had participated at the princely feast.

He impaled the older ones on stakes while forcing the others to march from the capital to the town of Poenari. This fifty-mile trek was quite grueling and no one was permitted to rest until they reached their destination.

Dracula then ordered the boyars to build him a fortress on the ruins of an older outpost overlooking the Arges River.

Many died in the process. Dracula, therefore, succeeded in creating a new nobility and obtaining a fortress for future emergencies.

What is left of the building today is identified as Poenari Fortress Cetatea Poenari. Vlad Tepes adopted the method of impaling criminals and enemies and raising them aloft in the town square for all to see.

Almost any crime, from lying and stealing to killing, could be punished by impalement.

dracula -

Diese Geschichten sind mehr chronologischer und strukturierter Art. Er legte sich mit dem Osmanischen Reich an, das mit der Eroberung Konstantinopels zur Weltmacht aufstieg. Im Gegenzug bot er an, vom orthodoxen zum römisch-katholischen Glauben zu konvertieren. Der Roman ist eine Mischung aus Reise- , Liebes- , Abenteuerroman und Schauergeschichte und besteht formal aus einer Folge von Tagebucheintragungen , Mitschriften von Phonographaufnahmen , Briefen und Zeitungsartikeln. Gegen Ungleichzeitigkeit hilft nur Ungleichzeitigkeit. Vampire auf der Ostsee. Das Werk wurde mit einem üppigen Budget von mehr als 40 Millionen Dollar produziert, wobei man jeden Dollar auf der Leinwand zu sehen bekommt. Wirklich schlecht ist Palance nicht, aber ihm fehlt der Charme eines Lugosi oder Lee, den Dracula unbedingt haben sollte. Sowohl der Sultan als auch Radu starben — ein günstiger Moment, den Osmanen die Walachei streitig zu machen. Dies ergibt sich vor allem, da Badham anders als Browning den Film nicht so statisch wie ein Bühnenstück inszeniert hat. Bei seiner Ankunft findet er sie jedoch ermordet wieder. Sie begann daran zu glauben, dass ein Vampir im Dorf spacemen 2 spielen Unwesen trieb und begab sich auf den "Pfad des Drachen" um ihn zu finden. Schon bald entdeckt Harker, dass der Graf ein Vampir ist und ihn gefangen hält. Die Flugschriften wurden über eine Zeitspanne von ca. Mit der Hilfe der örtlichen Wahrsagerin Beste Spielothek in Kleinkyhna finden gelingt es Moriani einen geheimen Weg in den Bergen zu finden, welcher ihn ins Schloss des Zwielichts führt. Gekleidet ist der Graf dagegen, wie es sich für einen Fürsten ziemt, was eher Erinnerungen an Bela Lugosi wachruft. Die Pest laden deutsch sich tatsächlich in der osmanischen Armee aus. Aus dem Logbuch des Kapitäns tipico bonus code bestandskunden man, dass sich offenbar "etwas" bzw. Ferner wird ihr Kopf abgetrennt und der Mund mit Knoblauch gefüllt. Für den gleichnamigen Spielfilm siehe Graf Dracula Sie vermuten, dass er nach Warna Bulgarien will, und fahren mit der Eisenbahn dorthin. Zebra lounge casino friedrichshafen Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Weiterführende Studien am Konservatorium der Stadt Wien. Diese Webseite verwendet Cookies zur Auswertung der Aufrufe.

Dracula Video

Vlad The Impaler : The Real Dracula - Full AMAZING Documentary HD

Overall "Dracula" is an amazingly good looking film that benefits from high production values and guaranteed performances mainly from Oldman and Hopkins.

Coppola's direction is strong, but a bit overbearing at times and sometimes it is unclear what the tone of the production truly is.

Watch for Italian beauty Monica Bellucci as one of Oldman's beautiful, but deadly wives. Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial. Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Bram Stoker novel , James V. Movie and TV Anniversaries for November Top Films of Share this Rating Title: Bram Stoker's Dracula 7.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Learn more More Like This. Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles A vampire tells his epic life story: The Lost Boys After moving to a new town, two brothers discover that the area is a haven for vampires.

From Dusk Till Dawn Three former parapsychology professors set up shop as a unique ghost removal service.

Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Most of the film is made up of interesting performances, most notably of Lugosi himself, who took a criminally low wage in order to take on the role he first performed on stage.

He even negotiated the rights for the play and book for the MGM. Lugosi is certainly enigmatic, many scenes showing penlights being shone into those dark orbs, brows lowered in mock irritation and sensuality.

The way Lugosi uses his hands, his aura permeating every scene, whether flanked by fake spider webs, the foggy docks of the London harbor, the box at the theater, or one hand moving out of his wooden coffin, ready to strike.

The two leads who portrayed victim Mina and her beau John were slightly annoying. Mina was susceptible to fainting spells, high pitched screams, and expressions of lost innocence while John's face only held the expressions of concern and horror.

The atmosphere of the film was quite interesting, the vampire running throughout the cityscape, his influence over his victims and accomplice evident from the fear they showcased.

The chase between the vampire and the famous Van Helsing wasn't as thrilling, years later, and the lack of sound was less off-putting than empty.

This was one of two performances Lugosi had as Dracula, while also portraying characters like the vampire in other MGM films.

His performance is one of the best in history, and there's no one else who can carry that heavy Hungarian drawl so many years later.

Dracula released in is probably the most famous version of Bram Stoker's classic work ever put on-screen. This is a brilliant piece of cinema in the early year's of the silver screen.

Universal cemented itself as a leader in the horror genre, and released many classic films that set the standards for many years to come.

Dracula made Bela Lugosi a star and ultimately a horror icon of the classic era of film. Although often overshadowed by Boris Karloff, his performance here definitely is a much more in depth performance, as Lugosi brings charisma to the title character that Karloff didn't seem to have.

I'm not saying that one is better than the other, all I'm saying is that Lugosi had a bit more screen presence and on-screen demeanor due to his larger speaking role.

The film itself has a strong sense of atmosphere, which is key to build effective chills and suspense. This a flawless horror picture that stands out even today because the idea issi simple, yet due to Lugosi you are just captivated and mesmerized by his performance.

There has been countless films based on Dracula, however this version along with Francis Ford Coppola's film really stand out because they bring a great cast to tell the Bram Stoker classic which have made vampires such an integral part of the horror genre.

Bela Lugosi is wonderful here and his hypnotic performance is among the greatest ever filmed. Dracula remains one of the best vampire films, and its influence on the genre is still apparent today.

A definite must see for horror fans. Now this is what you call a classic! It's a film that you can watch over and over again, as long as you have patience, and become incredibly immersed in the acting, since there was absolutely no score, which kind of takes e out of it at times, and there seems to be a missing element of suspense.

Still, the story is fantastic and it's definitely one that has inspired the entire horror genre, and for that, I am totally in it's debt.

The edited may be choppy for it's time, but the camerawork is far superior to even some of the films shot in todays day and age.

I honesty commend the cinematographers of this film. More Top Movies Trailers Forums. Season 7 Black Lightning: Season 2 DC's Legends of Tomorrow: Season 4 The Deuce: Season 2 Doctor Who: Season 11 The Flash: Season 3 Saturday Night Live: Season 4 The Walking Dead: The Crimes of Grindelwald First Reviews: Less Magical than the First.

Mina is not a fickle woman who would abandon her true love for the seductive wiles of the vampire Dracula. That always bothered me about the movies.

I didn't see why poor Lucy was deserving of what happened to her. Even if she had been a wanton, I couldn't say she deserved her demise at Dracula's hands.

Reading about her decline, death and resurgence as a vampire was extremely difficult, not to mention the effect it had on the loved ones she left behind.

Additionally, I dislike how throwaway the love that Mina had for Jonathan is portrayed in the movies.

I'm glad it was not this way in the book. Renfield is a character who has been played for laughs in many of the Dracula adaptations and knockoffs.

In the original novel, he is a character to be pitied. He was seduced by Dracula, subsequently losing his reason. There are glimpses of his formerly formidable intellect and sanity, as well as a sense of right and wrong that shone through, causing me to feel sorry for him.

Particularly when he warns Seward not to keep him in the Asylum. If only Seward had listened. Seward and Van Helsing are physicians and men of science with profound respect for each other, but who tend to look at situations differently.

Seward is very much a rationalist. He tries to approach Lucy's strange illness from a completely scientific perspective, yet Dr. Van Helsing is a learned man who is trained in modern medical science as well as a pioneer in medicine , but gives credence toward the ancient beliefs, and whose knowledge is shored up by his faith in God.

The struggle that Seward faces in having to accept that Lucy's demise is due to a powerful supernatural entity is evident as we read his journal entries.

Van Helsing is seen through the descriptions of the diary entries of Mina, Jonathan, and Seward. I found Van Helsing quite the character. Without a doubt, he's my favorite in this book, although I found some of his lines hard to read because of the fact that it is written as though English was his second language which it was.

He is a man of compassion, although with a tendency towards bluntness. I like that he's able to think his way out of difficult situations, but also relies on faith against his demonic enemy.

The movies tend to emasculate Jonathan, but he is a very strong character to have survived his imprisionment in Dracula's castle, with his body and his sanity intact.

His conviction to protect Mina at all costs, despite knowing the depths of the power of his enemy speaks to me. He might not be a he-man, but he is definitely a worthy man mate for Mina.

Arthur Holmwood is a noble, yet he is not protrayed as a prig. He is very down to earth, and willing to do his part to destroy Dracula and to see justice done for his beloved Lucy.

He definitely rose to the occasion, despite the seemingly insane ravings of Van Helsing about Un-dead creatures, and the need to drive a stake through the heart and cut off the head of his beloved.

Quincy Morris embodies the Texan spirit in the very best of ways. His devotion to Lucy and later Mina causes him to risk his life in the struggle against Dracula.

Don't look for a sexy creature of the night in this book. Dracula is a horrid, evil beast. When he meets his demise, I didn't feel one iota of sympathy.

I was cheering instead. It's refreshing to read about evil vamps without any charisma for once and this from a paranormal romance fanatic.

This book is a delicious work to have read. I'm glad I attempted it when I could fully appreciate its genius. I freely admit when I read it in high school, I wasn't ready for it.

It took me the better part of the week, but I found myself eager to keep reading, despite the somewhat antiquated language.

I wanted to see how things would unfold. You might think, "Well Dracula is old hat. I've seen many vampire movies.

It's all the same. You should read this book if you're a vampire fan. You will find a resonance that is lacking in most of the modern vampire fare, with its classic setting, genuine characters, and the tangible essence of the unearthly evil of the vampire.

And to think that Stoker wasn't quite as glutted on the rich milk of the vampire legends as us modern vamp fans are.

Maybe that's why this book felt so authentic to me. View all 51 comments. No man knows till he experiences it, what it is to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the veins of the woman he loves.

I say "seems" because I swear I've read it before. However, that would have been ages ago. Or a byproduct of seeing 10 million different Dracula interpretations before the age of O So it was fresh and relatively new to me.

I was surprised by the twists and turns. I thought I would be able to reasonably pre No man knows till he experiences it, what it is to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the veins of the woman he loves.

I thought I would be able to reasonably predict the whole plot - and I couldn't. Let's talk about major issues, because review space is limited and I believe everyone knows the basics of the plot.

Evil vampire, blood-sucking fiend, lives in Transylvania, moves to London, and fucks with the wrong people. Did NOT know who he was fucking with, as Riddick would say.

LOL You know the drill. Besides having status updates - with many quotes continued in the comments, I had copious notes and also a running list of vocabulary words that I learned from Dracula.

I very much enjoyed this reading. D You can tell from all my status updates and huge pile of notes. Sometimes I'd only read one or two pages in a day and just let them simmer inside me.

I've been thinking about Dracula non-stop for about 11 days now. It's been my constant companion these last 11 days.

I didn't leave home without it! LOL I sometimes think we must be all mad and that we shall wake to sanity in strait-waistcoats.

You knew I'd start with that, right? D This book is full of explicit sexist bullshit. Non-stop explicit sexist bullshit.

Yes, I understand that this was Please don't lecture me in the comments about presentism. I was surprised the sexism was so very blatant. There is a lot of talk - by all characters, male and female, about "brave men" and "weak, poor women who are just frail creatures" who "can't stand strain" and should be shielded from the world and from the truth.

Men are praised for being strong and brave and if a man is particularly brave, he's described as all man. Let's talk about Mina Murray-Harker. Harker is better out of it.

Things are quite bad enough for us, all men of the world, and who have been in many tight places for our time; but it is not place for a woman, and if she had remained in touch with the affair, it would in time infallibly have wrecked her.

She holds sexist myths and sexist beliefs very close to her heart. She even blames Eve and the "apple" for women's "inherently sinful nature" at one point!

I hate that shit. I could not resist the temptation of mystifying him a bit - I suppose it is some of the taste of the original apple that remains still in our mouths - so I handed him the shorthand diary.

Lucy gets three marriage proposals in one day, and even the men she rejects swear undying devotion and fealty to her.

Mina fares just the same. Every single male who comes into contact with these women prostrate themselves and declare their undying devotion.

And not in a sexual way! There's a need to have a woman to protect and champion and care for. And she provides her services as a stenographer, a shoulder to cry on, and a cheerful and beautiful presence to boost the men's spirits.

Now, you may think that this book is a sexist piece of shit, but I was actually surprised and impressed with Mina. She's smart, capable, and features prominently in the book.

Van Helsing praises her as having "a man's brain. Which brings me to another point. A very large subplot here is the interaction of Jonathan Harker and Mina.

Once privy to Jonathan's every thought and experience, Mina's position shifts when the other men encourage Jonathan to stop talking to Mina about vampires and the work they're doing to hunt Dracula completely, leaving her in the dark and cutting her out of their once coed meetings.

Jonathan does it, convinced it's the right thing to do, although he feels inside that it's wrong somehow. This is the man who, just before proposing to Mina, states that there should be no secrets or hiding between spouses and gives her his journal so that she knows all.

But he does it - and is punished severely for it. After that, Mina once again resumes an active role in the groups activities - as it should be, her fighting by their side.

Even though it may have been unintentional on Stoker's part, I was overall pleased with how things turned out, especially for a book written in Is this a feminist text?

I don't want to give you the wrong idea, it is NOT. But how about I file it in the 'not as bad as I thought it was going to be' category on the topic of feminism?

You have Jonathan Harker - Solicitor who is the first in the novel to encounter Dracula. I thought he was a complete ninny and think Mina could have done much better in picking a husband, but oh well.

Very fond of guns and shooting things. If America can go on breeding men like that, she will be a power in the world indeed.

John Seward - Psychologist who runs a mental asylum. Smarter and more badass than either Morris or Harker or Holmwood. I always thought Mina should have married him instead of that nitwit Jonathan Harker.

Arthur Holmwood - Rich. Engaged to Lucy Westenra. My life is hers, and I would give the last drop of blood in my body for her. I have an appetite like a cormorant, am full of life, and sleep well.

An appetite like a cormorant. Welp, that's a new one. Arthur says I am getting fat. Arthur can go fuck himself. What is this, James Bond?

Abraham Van Helsing - Badass name for a badass man. This was the only man I was interested in in the book. Intelligent, ruthless, gets shit done - but is still a kind, loving and polite person.

This is who I would be making eyes at if I were in London at the time. What is my point of listing all these men?

So you can discuss whether they are a. I mean, obviously I am always going to discuss that. But, the reason I'm bringing up the men here is because of their close friendship.

Holmwood, Morris and Seward served together in Korea, for crying out loud. It makes the book sound more like it's taking place in the s or s than the s, but that makes it all the better.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Stoker making these men brothers-in-arms in more ways than one! People who have fought together have a unique bond and trust with each other, and I think that makes these men in particular teaming up again once more - all the more potent.

They unconsciously fall into their old rapport and positions, and, led by Van Helsing, make a stellar team. Mina says that perhaps we are the instruments of ultimate good.

How can women help loving men when they are so earnest, and so true, and so brave! And, too, it made me think of the wonderful power of money!

What can it not do when it is properly applied; and what might it do when basely used! I felt so thankful that Lord Godalming is rich, and that both he and Mr.

Morris, who also has plenty of money, are willing to spend it so freely. For if they did not, our little expedition could not start, either so promptly or so well equipped, as it will within another hour.

Being brave and willing to die fighting vampires is one thing, but it's almost worthless without money for supplies, transportation, and constantly bribing people for information the way our heroes had to in this book.

I'm so proud of Stoker for bringing this up. However, I did not find the bloodsucking in this novel to be erotic at all, and therefore was undisturbed by it.

I know that in this would be considered very erotic bloodsucking - but in , to a pretty jaded vampire-fiction-reader, not so much. This was a relief to me, I was able to read the blood-sucking sections of the book without being too grossed out.

It was more like animals feeding than anything sexual. However, this book DID surprise me by making me genuinely horrified and grossed out.

But it wasn't the bloodsucking, it was the vampire killing. I have a real thing, apparently, against mutilating and desecrating dead bodies.

The scenes of "we're going to open up her coffin! We're going to stake her through the heart! Then chop off her head, cut out her heart, and stuff her mouth with garlic!

It was very horrifying and gross to me. I felt like they were violating the corpses and violating the very sanctity of death by doing this.

I was rather shocked, I had no idea I even thought sanctity of death was a belief of mine until they were gleefully beheading cadavers.

O Anyway, that was the true horror of the novel in my eyes. When the Brides approach the men seductively, the men are all over that. Jonathan is ready to strip down and party when the brides show up kneeling in front of him and licking their lips seductively, and Van Helsing himself is not unaffected.

They totally want those women on some level. But if it's Lucy or Mina or a woman who is supposed to be their "pure wife and mother stereotype," the men react with revulsion and disgust when lustful tendencies are shown.

Good luck on Jonathan and Mina ever reproducing if Jonathan's reaction to Mina coming on to him is one of horror and revulsion.

He probably only wants to have sex with all the lights off and missionary position, ten-thrusts-and-then-roll-off-her kind of thing. Probably with his eyes screwed shut the whole time.

I told her not to marry that ninny! And Lucy, goodness gracious. She was a bit sexual even as a "pure maiden," fantasizing about marrying three men at a time and shit, thank goodness she view spoiler [died hide spoiler ] before having sex with Holmwood.

I can't imagine she'd be happy in that marriage. He called her fat - what an asshole! Stoker uses this word 12 times in this novel and it gets seriously annoying.

Sometimes it's multiple times on the same page. It's as if he doesn't know of another word to describe a sexual woman.

Which is weird, because to me this more describes a certain body type than an attitude, but I looked it up in MW and it says that one meaning of the word is "giving pleasure to the senses," so I guess it works.

I am alone in the castle with those awful women. Mina is a woman, and there is naught in common. They are devils of the Pit! I shall not remain alone with them I'm always rather hesitant to pick up a book considered a classic and written over a hundred years ago, but Stoker delivers.

He uses a lot of modern wording and phrases, the book absolutely speeds along - it's never boring and he doesn't get bogged down describing the scenery for 10 pages.

That being said, I learned a lot of new words reading this: Foreknowledge, missal, unpunctual, prepossessing, perforce, patronymic, saturnine, demoniac not demonic, demoniac!

He uses it 9 times - get used to seeing it! Look at how much richer my vocabulary is now! I am a rich woman! It is odd that a thing which I have been taught to regard with disfavour and as idolatrous should in a time of loneliness and trouble be of help.

Is that there is something in the essence of the thing itself, or that it is a medium, a tangible help, in conveying memories of sympathy and comfort?

This book is strongly pro-Catholic and Catholic doctrine and beliefs are presented as the truth. Notice Van Helsing's liberal use of the Host Wafers - he hands them out like candy.

Even noted Protestants like Harker are wearing crucifixes by the end of the novel. I don't think this is proselytizing, exactly, but there's definitely a strong Catholic flavor and undertone to the novel.

Of course, Catholicism wins the day and provides Harker and his friends with the strength and tools to defeat evil, so ending the novel on a strong pro-Catholic note.

Some people claim that this book is anti-Semitic - I don't feel that it is. But one of the most enjoyable things about Dracula is that everyone reads the book differently and brings their own interpretations and experiences to the text.

It's been claimed as anti-Semitic, queer, homophobic, sexual, anti-sex, feminist, anti-feminist, etc. Dracula and the people who fight him can be stand-ins for anything and anybody, apparently.

Choose your own hot points after reading the novel. You can see I chose "feminist" and "pro-Catholic," but - much like the Bible - you can twist and turn the text until it says what you WANT it to say.

I mean, some of the things Dracula did in this novel were obviously just because he enjoys messing with Harker and tormenting him. They be nowt but air-blebs!

They, an' all grims an'signs an' warnin's, be all invented by parsons an' illsome beuk-bodies an' railway touters to skeer an' scunner hafflin's, an' to get folks to do somethin' that they don't other incline to do.

And what's even worse is that Stoker doesn't have to do it. Van Helsing speaks in a very distinct and "foreign" type of English, and yet Stoker never resorts to breaking down his words into atrociously spelled ones.

Here's an example of how Van Helsing speaks: He has the strength of many in his hand He can transform himself to wolf He can come in mist which he create He come on moonlight rays as elemental dust..

He become so small He can, when once he find his way, come out from anything or into anything, no matter how close it be bound or even fused up with fire I wish he'd done that for the working-class side characters!

I am so happy that I own a copy, it is going to be read and re-read over and over again, I can tell you that. I was so happy and pleased with this book - and it's so hit-or-miss with classics that I had no idea what to expect.

I highly recommend this to anyone who has an interest in it. Van Helsing, are you mad? How come that's never shown in any film?!?!?!?!

This is a National Geographic feature on a Romanian people living in the Carpathians and in the Transylvanian Alps etc. Here at this site: You can read about them, see pictures of them, and hear them sing.

It will really give you a more vivid and nuanced picture of what Jonathan Harker is seeing and hearing while traveling through Transylvania.

Make sure to check out the left side in order to access Photo Gallery and Multimedia where you can hear them singing! Oh, and if you click also on the left Sights and Sounds: View all 61 comments.

Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Despite being hailed " the most famous figure of seductive evil " in literature, Count Dracula proves to be neither scary nor seductive.

View all 21 comments. What started out as a simple real estate deal by an English solicitor and a foreign nobleman, becomes a blood sucking nightmare.

The shell shocked Jonathan is imprisoned by the creepy Count, a " person" you wouldn't want to see in a dark alley on a moonless midnight walk.

Three strange , bizarre , but v "Children of the night what music they play" ; Jonathan Hawker hears those chilling, famous words from the inhuman appearing Count Dracula, in the remote Castle Dracula , Transylvania Romania.

Three strange , bizarre , but very beautiful women, brides of Dracula, the weird sisters, are in his room looking not quite real.

When Dracula arrives also, they fade away Next day the Englishman can't decide if what he saw last night was a dream or fact Either way the terrified Mr.

Hawker escapes , as if his life depended on it, not caring about those eerie wolves , surrounding the building and disappears Back in "civilized", safe England his fiance Mina on vacation in Whitby, is visiting her sick, good friend Lucy Westenra, she becomes very pale too, almost like ill Lucy who is losing blood, why?

Seward with the help of Dr. Van Helsing an expert in little known diseases, gives her Lucy, four transfusions, still she becomes weaker, and small punctures are spotted on Miss Westenra's neck, what can they be?

A gruesome Bat is seen flying outside the window, lurking about waiting for who knows what Seward, the head of an insane asylum, has a star inmate named Renfield he likes keeping busy, by eating flies and spiders.

Something unnatural is disturbing the disturb man. Renfield even attempts to kill the good doctor. On the continent the dazed Jonathan, is found in a hospital in Budapest, disclosing events, in his journal, read by Mina when they get him back home..

Dracula is seen by Hawker in England, or was this man, the undead fiend , actually the Count? Better speak to Dr. Van Helsing, who they say has read about vampires and is an expert on the subject.

This old Dutchman doesn't mind getting his hands dirty The novel has inspired countless films, books and television shows There is an obvious reason for this phenomenon It still scares people The historical figure was a Romanian Prince, Vlad or Dracula, son 0f Dracul, the Dragon , known as the Impaler, an alias he acquired , and well deserved too View all 8 comments.

View all 29 comments. View all 7 comments. This was neither as bad as I assumed it would be or nor? Much as I love receiving real mail, whether it's a letter, present, post card, or even just a book I ordered Shucks, for me?

This is especially true when a lot of what you're reading is the journals of a bunch of people you'd never even want to have passing conversations with, Dr.

Van Helsing and Dr. Sewa This was neither as bad as I assumed it would be or nor? Seward being obvious exceptions.

Regardless, this is one of those books that fall under my largely arbitrary and completely self-imposed "Must Read Before I'm Dead" list.

In the midst of being asphyxiated by Proustian self-reckoning, I decided to take a break from being challenged and read something light. You know, like a Gothic novel about an immortal Vlad Tepes and his baby-eating whore-beasts.

It's funny what pop culture'll do to ya. I'd heard over and over again that this was like the Book of Genesis for the whole Twilight romancing the undead thing that weirds me out anew with each internet-drenched day.

A lovelorn Oldman, a sexually-repressed and reincarnated Ryder, absinth, slow-dancing in a castle with candles and string-music and shit, vampire nipple-sucking, orgasm-inducing illnesses, etc.

Wrong, wrong, and wrong again. Turns out, the movie's entire romantic twist on the story was really just artistic license on roids, and all Mina is to Dracula is a leisurely Sunday brunch.

I don't mean to insinuate that I was disappointed by this difference between book and screen as, needless to say, I have yet find myself reaching for the 19th-century literary fiction shelf when I feeeeeel like maaakin' lurrrrve.

Still, I think it's a distinction which inquiring minds may appreciate knowing before committing to this occasionally exciting but largely sloggy story.

The good parts were great, but the last ish pages-- appropriately set on a bunch of fucking boats just inching their way along the river--moved so slowly, became so tedious that I just felt like screaming "Christ Almighty, Dracula, would you just eat these fuckers already?

The first half is fun, though! Oh, and how dare you keep Tom Waits locked up in a cage. That's it, I'm calling your mother. View all 56 comments.

Der Drache wurde auch im Woiwodensiegel geführt. In Dracula lebt die Sucht nach Körperflüssigkeiten. Dracula erblickt das Bild von Harkers Verlobter in Beste Spielothek in Obermauer finden und kennt ab jetzt kein anderes Ziel, als Mina für sich zu gewinnen! Oktober auf VOX zu sehen. Der Familie seines dritten Opfers, der vierjährigen Erika Nanba, schrieb er eine Postkarte mit den aus Zeitschriften ausgeschnittenen Worten:. His performance is one of the best in history, and there's no one else who can carry that heavy Hungarian drawl so many years later. She is presented more as the more practical member of her relationship with Jonathan and the better planner, Sex & The City Slots - Sex and the City Slot Machines Online hsv handball bild that would typically go towards the male Pub Crawlers™ Slot Machine Game to Play Free in Rivals Online Casinos. Dracula is a complete and utter fiend. I thought I would be able to reasonably pre No man knows till he experiences it, what it is to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the veins of the woman he loves. The good parts were great, but the last ish pages-- appropriately set on a bunch of fucking boats just inching their way along the river--moved so slowly, became so tedious that I just felt like screaming "Christ Almighty, Dracula, would you just web money these fuckers already? They argue that Stoker in fact knew little of the historic Vlad III, Vlad the Impalerand Beste Spielothek in Niedersteina finden he used only the name "Dracula" and some miscellaneous scraps of Romanian history. His first major act of revenge was aimed at the boyars of Targoviste for not being loyal to his father. High 5 casino game library a cross between an epistolary novel, a detective novel and a save-my-wife papypal, and it's full of scares, horror and disgust, all described in a lurid tone onleine spiele befits the subject: Readers should also be aware trinkgeld im casino the characters tend to be along sentimental lines. Now you know WHAT it is but not where it is or when it will resurface, but it is there, it is present. Son of the Dragon. Bucuresti Nord Nearest bus stop:

Dracula -

Eine deutsche Erzählung berichtet: Sein Leichnam soll im Kloster von Snagov beigesetzt und von dort später an einen unbekannten Ort verbracht worden sein. Vlads Schreckenstaten gegen das walachische Volk wurden als Versuche interpretiert, seinen eigenen Verhaltenskodex in seinem Land durchzusetzen. Davon abgesehen erleben Leser des Romans jedoch eine adäquate Umsetzung des Stoffes. Aus dem Englischen von Ulrich Bossier. Die Pest breitete sich tatsächlich in der osmanischen Armee aus. Aus dem Englischen von Andreas Nohl. Der Spruch ist eine Zeile aus einem polemischen Gedicht des Dichters Mihai Eminescu — , in dem das nationalpolitische Desinteresse der rumänischen Oberschicht angegriffen wird. Dracula verflucht daraufhin Gott und ist zur Strafe fortan verdammt, als Untoter zu leben. Jahrhundert bis ins Eine Reihe von Ortschaften wird mit dem Namen des Fürsten in Verbindung gebracht und touristisch vermarktet. Cunningham will wissen was es mit der durch Von Krüger geführten Geheimoperation "Operation D" in auf sich hatte. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Sie handelt von Dracula, der nach London zurückkehrt, um sich an den Leuten zu rächen, die ihn Jahrhunderte früher verraten haben. In dieser Situation fiel es Vlads zum Islam konvertierten Halbbruder Radu nicht schwer, die walachischen Adeligen, von denen sich Vlad ohnehin schon weitgehend entfremdet hatte, von den Vorteilen einer Unterwerfung und Tributzahlungen an den Sultan zu überzeugen und sie so auf seine Seite zu ziehen. Viele der in den Flugschriften erschienenen Geschichten lassen sich in den rumänischen mündlichen Überlieferungen wiederfinden. Fürst der Walachei — Dracula ist eine der ersten klassischen Horrorgestalten, der ein filmisches Denkmal gesetzt wurde.

Categories: DEFAULT

0 Replies to “Dracula”